• English

PPT.- Gestionando el cambio a través de las personas

En el encuentro de junio del Club de Desarrollo personal y liderazgo, hemos contado con Vicente Garcés Director de vega for change quién, apoyándose en los conceptos clásicos de estrategia y gestión empresarial nos presentó un modelo ordenado, secuencial, sólido y útil para liderar y gestionar el cambio en nuestras organizaciones. Pinchando sobre la imagen puedes descargar la presentación completa de la...

Leer más

Ignore everybody: and 39 Other Keys to Creativity’ is a book about creativity

Ignore Everybody: and 39 Other Keys to Creativity’ is a book about creativity. It contains a collection of 40 tips on how to be creative. The book is an extension to the ‘How to be creative’ manifesto which the writer (Hugh MacLeod) published a few years ag. it’s an inspiring book. When Hugh MacLeod was a struggling young copywriter living in a YMCA, he started to doodle on the backs of business cards while sitting at a bar. Those cartoons eventually led to a popular blog-gapingvoid.com-and a reputation for pithy insight and humor, in both words and pictures. MacLeod has opinions on everything from marketing to the meaning of life, but one of his main subjects is creativity. How do new ideas emerge in a cynical, risk-averse world? Where does inspiration come from? What does it take to make a living as a creative person? More: How to be creative? MacLeod highlights the value of authenticity and hard work, and reveals the challenges and rewards of being...

Leer más

Small Data. The tiny clues that uncover huge trends

The book is based on a several year period of consumer studies for major corporations across the globe.It  features case studies of the author's work interviewing consumers in their homes and using his observations to create hypotheses as to why they use products the way that they do. Seemingly insignificant behavioral observations containing very specific attributes pointing towards an unmet customer need. Small data is the foundation for break through ideas or completely new ways to turnaround brands. Martin Lindstrom, a modern-day Sherlock Holmes, harnesses the power of "small data" in his quest to discover the next big thing. Hired by the world's leading brands to find out what makes their customers tick, Martin Lindstrom spends 300 nights a year in strangers' homes, carefully observing every detail in order to uncover their hidden desires and, ultimately, the clues to a multimillion-dollar product. Lindstrom connects the dots in this globetrotting narrative that will enthrall enterprising marketers as well as anyone with a curiosity about the endless variations of human behavior. You'll learn… How a noise reduction headset at 35,000 feet led to the creation of Pepsi's new trademarked signature sound. How a worn-down sneaker discovered in the home of an 11-year-old German boy led to LEGO's incredible turnaround. How a magnet found on a fridge in Siberia resulted in a US supermarket revolution. How a toy stuffed bear in a girl's bedroom helped revolutionize a fashion retailer's 1,000 stores in 20 different countries. How an ordinary bracelet helped Jenny Craig increase customer loyalty by 159 percent in less than a year. How the ergonomic layout of a car dashboard led to the redesign of the Roomba...

Leer más

PPT.- Las claves de la Fortaleza Emocional

En el encuentro de abril del Club de Desarrollo personal y liderazgo, tuvimos el placer de contar con Tomás Navarro, la primera persona que analiza define y desarrolla el concepto de fortaleza emocional. Tomás Navarro, es un psicólogo enamorado de las personas, empeñado en sacar la psicología de las consultas y ponerla al servicio de la humanidad para ayudarla a ser más feliz. A continuación puedes descargar la presentación completa que siguió durante la...

Leer más

INF.- Convergencia entre IT y OT

El anteriormente denostado sector industrial está resurgiendo con fuerza en las cabezas de los actores económicos y sociales. Su contribución al PIB, según un análisis del anterior Ministerio de Industria, Energía y Turismo, llegó a ser de un 18,8% en sus mejores momentos. Según el INE, en 2015 representó el 17,1%. Si bien está lejos del 74,9% del sector Servicios (2015), es cierto que ha demostrado ser un impulsor del I+D según ese mismo estudio. La retribución media de sus empleados está por encima de la de otros sectores y genera empleo atractivo. Es un gran punto a favor en un momento de inquietud social por el denominado empleo de calidad. Este éxito del sector industrial no es posible sin la mejora de su productividad. En Wired for Innovation, los investigadores Erik Brynjolfsson y Adam Saunders del Center for the Digital Economy del MIT, indican cómo los ingresos medios por persona, ajustados según inflación, fueron en 2008 algo más de cinco veces los de 1913. Y aun así esta cifra no incorpora la enorme diferencia en calidad de vida y de los productos que se disfruta en 2008: aires acondicionados, transportes rápidos y seguros, comunicaciones instantáneas, mejores cuidados sanitarios, etc. El porqué de esta mejora radica en la productividad. Cualquier medida que contribuya a su incremento debe apoyarse e impulsarse con decisión. Existe finalmente un motivo social para que así sea. Uno de los mayores factores impulsores de la productividad son las tecnologías de la información (IT). La industria ha incorporado desde sus inicios una gran cantidad de mejoras tecnológicas mecánicas, eléctricas, de métodos, electrónicas, etc. La incorporación de las tecnologías de la información es relativamente más reciente (autómatas programables, sistemas embebidos, software de supervisión y control), pero creciente. Y este crecimiento se espera que sea exponencial: MES, procedimientos digitales, IoT, Big Data, robótica, inteligencia artificial, realidad aumentada, etc. Dado el gran efecto positivo que tiene en la productividad, los responsables en las industrias deberían facilitarlo. La historia empresarial ha demostrado que no suele obtenerse el mayor provecho de una tecnología si no se modifican los comportamientos, la organización...

Leer más

Superbosses

HOW EXCEPTIONAL LEADERS MASTER THE FLOW OF TALENT What do Ralph Lauren, Larry Ellison, Julian Robertson, Jay Chiat, Bill Walsh, George Lucas, Bob Noyce, Lorne Michaels, and Mary Kay Ash have in common? Certainly all of them are known for being talented and successful—even legendary—in their respective fields. All have reputations as innovators who pioneered new business models, products, or services that created billions of dollars in value. But there’s one thing that distinguishes these business icons from their equally famous peers: the ability to groom talent. They didn’t just build organizations; they spotted, trained, and developed a future generation of leaders. They belong in a category beyond superstars: superbosses. Professor Finkestein started researching this cohort of managers a decade ago, when he noticed a curious pattern:” If you look at the top people in a given industry, you’ll often find that as many as half of them once worked for the same well-known leader. In professional football, 20 of the NFL’s 32 head coaches trained under Bill Walsh of the San Francisco 49ers or under someone in his coaching tree. In hedge funds, dozens of protégés of Julian Robertson, the founder of the investment firm Tiger Management, have become top fund managers. And from 1994 until 2004, nine of the 11 executives who worked closely with Larry Ellison at Oracle and left the company without retiring went on to become CEOs, chairs, or COOs of other...

Leer más