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Brain Rules

Publicado por a las 13:16 en las categorías de Libros del mes, Professional Reading Club | Comentarios desactivados en Brain Rules

Brain Rules

  Brain Rules: 12 Principles for Surviving and Thriving at Work, Home, and School by John Medina takes what neuroscientists have learned about the brain and explains it in a way anybody can understand. With a heavy emphasis on the brain as a product of evolution (and countless references to peer-reviewed studies), Medina covers 12 brain functions and explains what goes on in the brain when they take place. Each chapter begins with an enticing hook, anecdote, or psychological experiment that illustrates some facet of a “brain rule.” Medina then explains the science behind the story while highlighting the importance of specific molecular changes that occur in the brain. Next, he presents guidelines for the reader to implement, such as the value of a power nap or a daily walk, to prevent neurological disorders and improve cognition. His advice provides a refreshing look at our lives through the lens of current scientific knowledge. Medina also includes several examples of current research in neuroscience to illustrate each brain rule. One interesting experiment explores the brain activity of a patient who observed a picture of Jennifer Aniston and another who viewed a picture of Halle Berry. The study, published by Dr Quiroga in Nature, used depth electrodes to monitor firing behavior of individual neurons in patients with epilepsy. One patient had a neuron that would fire only to a picture of Jennifer Aniston but not to pictures of other famous people. Another patient had a neuron that responded to a picture of Halle Berry dressed as Catwoman, but not to other actors dressed as Catwoman. Medina even explores brain differences between men and women and notes the “troubled history” of such discussions. Nevertheless, he provides helpful scientific information that neither supports stereotypes nor completely destroys them. In such discussions, he is first a scientist, helping the reader look at the facts and understand the biology before interpreting its application. In Brain Rules, Dr. Medina outlines 12 interesting ways to understand how our brain works. Each one of rules has a direct application to our understanding of the behavioral analysis. I will briefly give an overview of each of Dr. Medina’s 12 Rules: Rule #1 Exercise In this chapter, Dr. Medina discusses how as human beings we were designed to be active. Exercise is an essential part of our long-term health, well-being, and intellect! To be a professional, exercise must be an integral part of a training program. Scientists believe that for thousands of years humans walked at least 12 miles a day. This suggests that the human brain developed and evolved while people were on the move. Movement being our natural state likely explains why there are so many positive brain-related benefits that are directly caused by exercise. Regular exercise increases energy level, cognitive performance (reasoning, problem solving, memory, among others measures), attention, self-esteem, immune response, and balance. It has also been shown to decrease your risks of disease (it cuts the likelihood of getting dementia and Alzheimer’s by at least half), and significantly lowers your chances of getting both cancer and depression. The reason it’s so beneficial to our brain’s health is twofold. Exercise makes oxygen available to the brain while clearing out some of the molecular waste that has built up there. It also helps our feeling of well-being...

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Super Connector

Publicado por a las 11:40 en las categorías de Know Box, Libros del mes, Professional Reading Club | Comentarios desactivados en Super Connector

Super Connector

This book tell us to Stop Networking, seriously, stop doing it. Now. It is time to ditch the old networking-for networking's-sake mentality in favor of a more powerful and effective approach to creating and enhancing connections. In Superconnector, Scott Gerber and Ryan Paugh reveal a new category of professionals born out of the social media era: highly valuable community-builders who make things happen through their keen understanding and utilization of social capital. Superconnectors understand the power of relationship-building, problem-solve by connecting the dots at high levels, and purposefully cause different worlds and communities to interact with the intention of creating mutual value. They don't just meet people for business-card collection's sake; they understand the power of relationship-building, problem-solve by connecting the dots at high levels, and purposefully cause different worlds and communities to interact with the intention of creating mutual value. Superconnector shows readers why it's time to leave their bad networking habits in favor of a new three-pronged Vision-Execution-Profiting approach. The core message is simple: Connect with others in the right way, and your life and career will be enriched. To understand the Supperconnector it is necesary to understand the antithesis, which is a networker. A typical networker is someone who is transactional, short-term focused, transaction-only oriented, and really, frankly is using these very old-school, antiquated tactics to try to get themselves a personal gain of some kind. Connectors are people that see the equation very differently. They’re empathetic and emotionally intelligent, they’re habitually generous, they want to give to others, they want to build a community around themselves rather than think “Oh I got you one, you get me one now,” or “You owe me,” or “I need to get something out of this person.”They never think like that. They’re thinking longer term about building deeper, more meaningful relationships. And then Superconnectors are a percentage of the top of the pyramid if you will. When people say “Oh, who do you think knows this person,” or “Who do you think I should call about this problem?” They’re the people that come first to the top of the mind. Those are the best of breed, best of class, people that really are the top most thoughtful connectors. This book is both philosophical and instructional in nature - it explains why being a superconnector is important, demonstrates how it has impacted many people, critical projects and businesses successfully, and teaches exactly how various real-life superconnectors manifest destiny by being deliberate in their actions. From knowing how to connect the dots, both ideas and people, adopting a giving mindset, to the use of literal platforms/frameworks that make connecting with others more effective. [box type="shadow"]   The authors: Scott Gerber is CEO of The Community Company, an organization that builds and manages community-driven programs for media companies and global brands. He is the founder of YEC, an invitation-only organization for the world’s most successful young entrepreneurs. He is also the founder of Forbes Councils, a collective of invitation-only organizations for world-class executives. Scott is the co-author of Superconnector and author of Never Get a “Real” Job. He is a sought-after speaker, regularly published thought leader, and a contributor to Adweek. He has been featured numerous times on television and podcasts, and his work has been honored by NASDAQ and the White House....

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Getting to YES Negotiating agreement without giving in

Publicado por a las 14:02 en las categorías de Know Box, Libros del mes, Professional Reading Club | Comentarios desactivados en Getting to YES Negotiating agreement without giving in

Getting to YES Negotiating agreement without giving in

Getting to Yes is the book you should've read. Whether you'reu asking for a raise, working on a business deal, or dealing with your landlord, if you're looking for more sophistication and success in your negotiation strategies than "start high", this is the book for you. Getting to Yes is a complete framework for "principled negotiation"–two or more parties working together to best address their mutual interests with creative, objectively fair solutions. If you're unfamiliar with principled negotiation, it's the complete opposite of our conventional image of negotiation: two hard-heads pitted against one another in a battle of will and wit. This book is not about mind-bending or psychological tricks–rather. Rather, it is a systematic process to ensure you make the most out of negotiation while achieving a durable outcome, beginning with how to know whether to negotiate at all and what to consider a positive outcome. This book is definitely worth a quick review/re-read before any major negotiation. Below is my short field manual for reference. Planning: Before starting out, develop a BATNA and trip wire so you know exactly what you are trying to get out of negotiation and when it's no longer worth the time. Remember that the reason you negotiate is to produce something better than the results you can obtain without negotiating. Start listing out (guessing is ok) what the interests of each side are Brainstorm and list out any negative perceptions the other side has about you, and think of ways to counter these perceptions by acting in ways that are inconsistent with them Make note of conflicting interests and brainstorm potential objective criteria for resolving them Negotiating: Clearly identify and list out both side's interests (use a whiteboard) and then focus on a nonjudgmental brainstorming session to come up with ways to address various interests During negotiation, always respond to positions and demands by asking for the principled justification (eg. how did you determine that?) Continue to extract interests from positions and list them Sit side by side facing the problem to reinforce as a team-based problem solving activity Do not back down from your interests. Don't be glued to any positions, but stay hard on your interests and insist they be addressed objectively. Don't fall for the "let's all agree and put an end to this" bandwagon. Don't forget about your BATNA and trip wire. Know when to end negotiation. Why positional bargaining is bad All negotiation methods should be judged by three criteria: It should produce a wise agreement if agreement is possible It should be efficient It should improve or at least not damage the relationship between the parties In typical negotiations, each side picks a position and argues for it, making concessions to reach a compromise. "Hard bargaining" fails all the criteria: It produces unwise outcomes. Parties are entrenched in their positions... making it less likely that any agreement will wisely reconcile the parties original interests. Energy is paid to positions vs. meeting the underlying concerns of the parties. It's inefficient. Bargaining over positions creates incentives which stall settlement, eg. starting with an extreme position, stubbornly holding to it, deceiving the other party, making small concessions only as necessary to keep the negotiation going. It endangers the relationship. Positional bargaining becomes a contest of will, resulting in anger and resentment when a...

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The Anticipatory Organization

Publicado por a las 13:33 en las categorías de Libros del mes, Professional Reading Club | Comentarios desactivados en The Anticipatory Organization

The Anticipatory Organization

Disruption is shaking all industries and established business models today. Retail is being hammered by eCommerce; fossil fuel driven vehicles by electric vehicles; Uber is making customers think whether they should own a car? Customer and employee loyalty have an increasingly short shelf life. Is strategic planning dead as some gurus shriek from pulpits? As Nestle’s experiences with the ban on Maggi noodles shows, even after hiring the best brains, building a culturally evolving organisation or investing a fortune on data and information management tools, gazing into the future is a hazardous activity, more so in the VUCA age. The U.S. healthcare industry was also recently given a shock treatment with the announcement of a new company to be launched by heavyweights Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett and Jamie Dimon to tackle the high cost healthcare industry. Welcome to the World of Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity and Ambiguity. In this uncertain world, Futurist Daniel Burrus’s pathbreaking book The Anticipatory Organization comes a welcome respite from the tensions and stresses of forecasting into the foggy future where established practices such as strategic planning are not working. Within this fast-changing future, opportunities will be revealed to those who can separate the Hard Trends that will happen, from the Soft Trends that might happen.   [box type="shadow"] DANIEL BURRUS Daniel Burrus is considered one of the World’s Leading Futurists on Global Trends and Innovation. The New York Times has referred to him as one of the top three business gurus in the highest demand as a speaker. He is the author of seven books, including The New York Times and Wall Street Journal best-seller Flash Foresight, as well as the international best-seller Technotrends. His latest book is called The Anticipatory Organization: Turn Disruption and Change Into Opportunity and Advantage. [/box]   A Hard Trend is a projection based on measurable, tangible, and fully predictable facts, events, or objects. It’s something that will happen: a future fact that cannot be changed. In contrast, a Soft Trend is a projection based on statistics that have the appearance of being tangible, fully predictable facts. It’s something that might happen: a future maybe. Soft Trends can be changed, which means they provide a powerful vehicle to influence the future and can be capitalized on. This distinction completely changes how individuals and organizations view and plan for the future. Understanding the difference between Hard and Soft Trends allows us to know which parts of the future we can be right about. When you learn how to analyze trends in this way, you can accurately predict future disruptions, identify and solve problems before they happen, and practice what the author call “everyday innovation.” This enables you to solve challenges and problems faster and see opportunities that were impossible just a few years before. In other words, you become anticipatory rather than reactionary. As Professor Burrus explains, the future is far more certain than we realize and changes still take place much more slowly than we think.  For example, a concept like Electric Vehicles has been around for more than a decade and it will still require at least another two decades where these vehicles are a significant threat to existing fuel-based technologies. This gives enough breathing space for vehicle companies and those companies which supply to these OEMs, to make...

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The new one minute manager

Publicado por a las 14:42 en las categorías de Know Box, Libros del mes, Professional Reading Club | Comentarios desactivados en The new one minute manager

The new one minute manager

The New One Minute Manager it is an updated revision of the bestselling book, The One Minute Manager, publish in 1982, a small book that requires only about an hour to read and uses a parable to teach three crucial management skills, that one learned will stick in your memory forever. In the introduction to the new version, authors Ken Blanchard an Spencer Johnson discuss the differences in the world in the more than thirty years since the original book was published. Must has changed in the past three and a half decades, notably the near unanimous agreement that top down command and control management is counterproductive and that longer just a pay check for employees but must, instead, be a source of fulfillment and purpose“.   [dropcap style="font-size: 60px; color: #9b9b9b;"] A[/dropcap]s in the original edition, the new edition tells the story of a young man who has been looking all over the world for a great manager to work for and learn from. He finally finds a great manager, who is know as the “New One Minute Manager”. This great manager introduces him to his core managing philosophy that “people who feel good about themselves produce good results. This manager has found the secret formula to concurrently achieve results for the company, and fulfilment for his team; and is able to adapt his techniques to keep up with rapid changes. The young man then goes on to talk with there lower- level manager of the great manager’s team who explain the three secrets of one-minute management and the young man discovers his 3 secrets, and is eventually offered a job, and becomes a New One Minute Manager. The fictional manager if the 1980s made it clear what employees’ responsibilities were and how they would be held accountable. But management has changed, according to the New One Minute Manager. The manager in the new edition discusses the problems with top-down management: “ Today that structure is too slow. It doesn’t inspire people an it stifles innovation. Customers demand quicker service and better products, so we need everyone to contribute their talent. “ This leads to the necessity of collaboration in goal setting, decision-making, and strategizing. So the first manager describes the first secrete: One Minute Goals: Three to five succinctly formulated goals (readable in one minute) tied to the key areas of responsibility. This remains essentially the same, except the goal-setting is now a collaborative exercise.   Secret One: One minute goals One common problem in organizations is the lack of clearly defined roles and responsibilities. In order for people to be effective: They must know exactly what their goals are and what success looks like. This definition must be shared between the staff and the supervisor. One minute Goals are about setting goals that can fit in 1 page, and be reviewed daily in less than 1 minute every day. After setting one-minutes goals, stay in close contact wit6h your staff: Monitor their activities or results, and request for short progress reports. It is vital to explain that the reason for your close supervisions in not to pick on their mistakes, but to catch them doing something right. This paves the way for you to apply the other 2 secretes of the News One Minute Manager: to...

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Professional Reading Club: START WITH WHY

Publicado por a las 19:18 en las categorías de Know Box, Libros del mes, Professional Reading Club | Comentarios desactivados en Professional Reading Club: START WITH WHY

Professional Reading Club: START WITH WHY

This month, in the Professional Reading book we have proposed to read the book Start with why , by Simon Sinek. Simon Sinek's recent video on 'The Millennial Question' went viral with over 150 million views. Why are some people and organisations more inventive, pioneering and successful than others? And why are they able to repeat their success again and again? In business, it doesn't matter what you do, it matters WHY you do it. Start with Why analyses leaders like Martin Luther King Jr and Steve Jobs and discovers that they all think in the same way - they all started with why. Simon Sinek explains the framework needed for businesses to move past knowing what they do to how they do it, and then to ask the more important question-WHY? Why do we do what we do? Why do we exist? Learning to ask these questions can unlock the secret to inspirational business. Sinek explains what it truly takes to lead and inspire and how anyone can learn how to do it You can read the complete summary here....

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Professional Reading Club: First, Break All The Rules. What the World’s Greatest Managers Do Differently from Gallup.

Publicado por a las 13:29 en las categorías de Know Box, Libros del mes, Professional Reading Club | Comentarios desactivados en Professional Reading Club: First, Break All The Rules. What the World’s Greatest Managers Do Differently from Gallup.

Professional Reading Club: First, Break All The Rules. What the World’s Greatest Managers Do Differently from Gallup.

This month in The Professional Reading Club  we have analyzed the book: First, Break All The Rules: What the World’s Greatest Managers Do Differently from Gallup. In this book, Gallup presents the remarkable findings of its revolutionary study of more than 80,000 managers in First, Break All the Rules, revealing what the world’s greatest managers do differently. With vital performance and career lessons and ideas for how to apply them, it is a must-read for managers at every level. Included with this re-release of First, Break All the Rules: updated meta-analytic research and access to the Clifton StrengthsFinder assessment, which reveals people’s top themes of talent, and to Gallup’s Q12 employee engagement survey, the most effective measure of employee engagement and its impact on business outcomes. You can read the complete review...

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Professional Reading Club: Art of risk. The new Science of Courage, Caution & Change

Publicado por a las 18:49 en las categorías de Know Box, Libros del mes, Professional Reading Club | Comentarios desactivados en Professional Reading Club: Art of risk. The new Science of Courage, Caution & Change

Professional Reading Club:  Art of risk. The new  Science of Courage, Caution & Change

In the Professional Reading Club we start the year with the book the Art of risk,: The new Science of Courage, Caution & Change by Kay Skudel Are risk-takers born or made? Why are some more willing to go out on a limb (so to speak) than others? How do we weigh the value of opportunities large or small that may have the potential to change the course of our lives? These are just a few of the questions that author Kayt Sukel tackles, applying the latest research in neuroscience and psychology to compelling real-world situations. Building on a portfolio of work that has appeared in such publications as "Scientific American," "Atlantic Monthly," "The Washington Post," and more, Sukel offers an in-depth look at risk-taking and its role in the many facets of life that resonates on a personal level. Smart, progressive, and truly enlightening, "The Art of Risk" blends riveting case studies and hard-hitting science to explore risk-taking and how it impacts decision-making in work, play, love, and life, providing insight in understanding individual behavior and furthering personal success." You can read de complete review...

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Professional Reading Club. The new roles of work: The modern Paybook for Navigating your Career.

Publicado por a las 17:29 en las categorías de Know Box, Libros del mes, Professional Reading Club | Comentarios desactivados en Professional Reading Club. The new roles of work: The modern Paybook for Navigating your Career.

Professional Reading Club.  The new roles of work: The modern Paybook for Navigating your Career.

This month, in the professional reading Club we have analyzed the book “ The new roles of work: The modern Paybook for Navigating your Career. ." The guide, written by Kathryn Minshew and Alexandra Cavoulacos, founders of the career website The Muse, offers practical strategies and quick exercises to help you figure out your career direction, land a job you truly want and then succeed at it. What makes this book unique is that its ideas are all provided within the context of today's modern workplace – where changing companies frequently is the norm, career trajectories are much less linear than in the past and new technologies require a completely different approach to job search. You can read the full summary and access to the templates for finding a meaningful career, templates for career exploration and job applications and Templates for career management. Here you can read our full review of this book.  ...

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Professional Reading Club. Barking up the wrong tree by Eric Barker

Publicado por a las 18:34 en las categorías de Know Box, Libros del mes, Professional Reading Club | Comentarios desactivados en Professional Reading Club. Barking up the wrong tree by Eric Barker

Professional Reading Club. Barking up the wrong tree by Eric Barker

In October,  in our Professional Reading Club, the book that we have proposed is Barking UP the wrong tree by Eric Baker, in this book Eric Barker reveals the extraordinary science behind what actually determines success and most importantly, how anyone can achieve it. You’ll learn: Why valedictorians rarely become millionaires, and how your biggest weakness might actually be your greatest strength Whether nice guys finish last and why the best lessons about cooperation come from gang members, pirates, and serial killers Why trying to increase confidence fails and how Buddhist philosophy holds a superior solution The secret ingredient to “grit” that Navy SEALs and disaster survivors leverage to keep going How to find work-life balance using the strategy of Genghis Khan, the errors of Albert Einstein, and a little lesson from Spider-Man By looking at what separates the extremely successful from the rest of us, we learn what we can do to be more like them—and find out in some cases why it’s good that we aren’t. Barking Up the Wrong Tree draws on startling statistics and surprising anecdotes to help you understand what works and what doesn’t so you can stop guessing at success and start living the life you want. Here you can read our full review of this book....

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